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First generation of residents in the era of Covid-19. Giving honor to whom honor is due


Journal of Anesthesia & Critical Care: Open Access
Victor  M. Whizar-Lugo,1 Karen Iñiguez-López2

Abstract

Since its first report in December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become the most recent pandemic rapidly affecting all countries of the planet, leaving until today a balance of 118 754 336 infected persons and 2 634 370 fatalities in the world. As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, it has modified our way of life, the economy has been severely damaged, and health systems have been insufficient throughout the planet. The COVID-19 pandemic had in a short time rapid and unavoidable effects on the training and work plans of all new healthcare personnel, especially residents, interns, and nurses, as well as undergraduate students from medicine and nursing. The first generation of specialists and subspecialists trained under these changes have just graduated. The last year of their medical training was damaged due to the time they had to spend managing COVID-19 patients. Many of these young doctors lost their lives in the line of fire. The training of the fellows who survived should be complemented in their first years of their practice as specialists, but their knowledge and skills acquired during their residency will benefit global health by having doctors properly trained in the fight against COVID-19.

Keywords

Since its first report in December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become the most recent pandemic rapidly affecting all countries of the planet, leaving until today a balance of 118 754 336 infected persons and 2 634 370 fatalities in the world. As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, it has modified our way of life, the economy has been severely damaged, and health systems have been insufficient throughout the planet. The COVID-19 pandemic had in a short time rapid and unavoidable effects on the training and work plans of all new healthcare personnel, especially residents, interns, and nurses, as well as undergraduate students from medicine and nursing. The first generation of specialists and subspecialists trained under these changes have just graduated. The last year of their medical training was damaged due to the time they had to spend managing COVID-19 patients. Many of these young doctors lost their lives in the line of fire. The training of the fellows who survived should be complemented in their first years of their practice as specialists, but their knowledge and skills acquired during their residency will benefit global health by having doctors properly trained in the fight against COVID-19.

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