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Does cognitive functional therapy improves chronic low back pain? a case report


International Journal of Complementary & Alternative Medicine
João Barboza da Silva Neto,1,2,4 Gislene Gomes da Silva,1 Thiago Santos Batista,1,5 Cláudio Cazarini Júnior,1,3 Diego Galace de Freitas1,3

Abstract

Objective: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a limiting musculoskeletal condition, not a disease that affects social and psychological features even economical field of world population affecting mainly man active workers range 35 to 55years old. The major challenge for dealing with this pathology is that patients present, depressive, pain catastrophization and kinesiophobic signs, reducing adherence to treatment. For this reason, the purpose of this case report was to verify the effect of a physical therapy model based on cognitive functional therapy on pain, function and quality of life in a patient with chronic non-specific low back pain. 
Design: Case report. 
Setting: Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo Hospital. 
Subject: A 52years old man, married and industry machinery operation worker diagnosed with chronic low back pain. 
Methods: Application of thirteen questionnaires for pain, function and quality of life outcomes in initial evaluation, middle and end of the rehabilitation protocol based on cognitive functional therapy. 
Results: In the end of the treatment with emphasis on biopsychosocial approach, the patient was able to get back to his normal activities of daily living, working and exercising without pain. 
Conclusion: This case report presented positive results in relation to pain, function and quality of life in a patient with chronic non-specific low back pain submitted to a physical therapy model based on cognitive functional therapy.
 

Keywords

low back pain, cognitive therapy, physical therapy, motor control, world health organization, multifactorial etiology, cognitive functional, biopsychosocial physiotherapeutic, kinesiophobia

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