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Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria isolated from clinical samples 


Journal of Bacteriology & Mycology: Open Access
Fatma BACALAN,1 Fatih CAKIR,2 Nida OZCAN,2 Nezahat AKPOLAT2

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Abstract

Abstract
Background/aims: Anaerobic bacteria have attracted the attention of scientists as the causative agents of serious infections since the 19th century. Antibiotic resistance has become a major problem among these bacteria, but antibiotic susceptibility testing has not been standardized yet.
Materials and methods: In this study, anaerobic bacteria isolated from a total of 800 clinical materials sent to our laboratory were evaluated. A total of 69 anaerobic bacteria isolated were identified with VITEK 2 (Biomerieux). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on 23 of 69 isolates with gradient test method.
Results: Identified anaerobic bacteria were Prevotella spp. (19 isolates, 27.5%), Veillonella spp. (14 isolates, 20.2%), Bacteroides spp. (9 isolates, 13%), Peptoniphilus spp. (6 isolates, 8.6%), Parvimonas spp. (5 isolates, 7.2%), Fusobacterium spp. (3 isolates, 4.3%), Actinomyces spp. (3 isolates, 4.3%), Parabacteroides spp. (2 isolates, 2.8%), Finegoldia magna (2 isolates, 2.8%), Clostridium spp. (2 isolates, 2.8%), Propionibacterium spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%), Peptostreptococcus spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%), Bifidobacterium spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%) and Lactobacillus spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%). Resistance rates of anaerobic bacteria to metronidazole, imipenem, penicillin, clindamycin and cefoxitin were found as %95.7, %100, %69.6, %82.6, %95.7 respectively. 
Conclusion: Treatment of infections caused by anaerobic microorganisms is usually empirical. Periodic determination of regional susceptibility patterns will help clinicians choose appropriate antibiotics for such infections.
Abstract
Background/aims: Anaerobic bacteria have attracted the attention of scientists as the causative agents of serious infections since the 19th century. Antibiotic resistance has become a major problem among these bacteria, but antibiotic susceptibility testing has not been standardized yet.
Materials and methods: In this study, anaerobic bacteria isolated from a total of 800 clinical materials sent to our laboratory were evaluated. A total of 69 anaerobic bacteria isolated were identified with VITEK 2 (Biomerieux). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on 23 of 69 isolates with gradient test method.
Results: Identified anaerobic bacteria were Prevotella spp. (19 isolates, 27.5%), Veillonella spp. (14 isolates, 20.2%), Bacteroides spp. (9 isolates, 13%), Peptoniphilus spp. (6 isolates, 8.6%), Parvimonas spp. (5 isolates, 7.2%), Fusobacterium spp. (3 isolates, 4.3%), Actinomyces spp. (3 isolates, 4.3%), Parabacteroides spp. (2 isolates, 2.8%), Finegoldia magna (2 isolates, 2.8%), Clostridium spp. (2 isolates, 2.8%), Propionibacterium spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%), Peptostreptococcus spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%), Bifidobacterium spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%) and Lactobacillus spp. (1 isolate, 1.4%). Resistance rates of anaerobic bacteria to metronidazole, imipenem, penicillin, clindamycin and cefoxitin were found as %95.7, %100, %69.6, %82.6, %95.7 respectively. 
Conclusion: Treatment of infections caused by anaerobic microorganisms is usually empirical. Periodic determination of regional susceptibility patterns will help clinicians choose appropriate antibiotics for such infections.
 

Keywords

anaerobic bacteria, antibiotics resistance, gradient test method, microbiota, clindamycin, bacterial infections

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